A Postcard from Copenhagen

It’s possible not many people noticed – because I was gone for a short while, I didn’t really mention it, and I kept pretty up to date on posts and comments – but I was in Copenhagen this weekend for a short city break.

Copenhagen is a beautiful city, and I’m sure no matter what time of the year you go it’s the same story, but in the run up to Christmas exploring the city and seeing the sights is a completely different experience. There are Christmas markets on every corner selling arts and crafts alongside mulled wine and hot chocolate with Bailey’s, every shop window and storefront is decorated for Christmas with fairy lights and snow. There’s ice skating if you’re brave enough and warm cosy cafes if you’re not.

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The first thing me and my sister did when we arrived in Copenhagen, after checking into our hotel and freshening up, was head to Tivoli Gardens. It’s similar to Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park but bigger, better, and even more Christmassy if you can imagine. We both had a wonderful time walking through the market seeing the decorations that had been set up for the occasion, riding all the rollercoaster’s we could find until we felt physically ill, and seeing the lights come on when the sun went down that evening.

Aside from Tivoli there are plenty of other sights you need to see if you’re in Copenhagen for the weekend; there’s the Little Mermaid sculpture which is a popular tourist destination, as well as plenty of castles, churches and parks you can spend whole mornings or afternoons exploring. My favourite part of Copenhagen though was Nyhavn, the waterfront port and probably one of the most picturesque parts of the city. If you search for Copenhagen on Google images Nyhavn is probably one of the first image that will appear.

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And of course in terms of Christmas shopping Copenhagen cannot be beat. Whether you’re walking down the main strip where all the well-known high street stores and souvenirs shops are, or wandering around one of the many Christmas markets, you can find something for everyone on your Christmas list.

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Advice (a.k.a. learn from my mistakes)

  • It’s cold, but not that cold…Granted I was there in November and not December/January time but a warm coat and a hat were all I really needed. Plus after walking around most of the day I felt I could have taken off my coat and just worn my thick jumper.
  • You can walk across the whole city…There is public transport but I didn’t use it once. The city itself is quite small and you can walk the length of it quite quickly, so if you have a good pair of shoes you won’t need to waste money on public transport at all.
  • If you go to Tivoli, go on a weekday…Me and my sister were lucky enough that we went on the Friday when we arrived in Copenhagen, because the queues we saw on the Saturday and Sunday were insane. So if you’re going to go go on a weekday when the kids are at school and the adults at work.

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You can go to Copenhagen any time of the year, and I’d definitely recommend going there if you have the opportunity, but for me one of the best parts of the whole holiday was seeing the city in the run up to Christmas; exploring the Christmas markets, drinking mulled wine on the waterfront, and falling over more than once trying to ice skate.


Also to celebrate reaching my one year blogiversary I am hosting a giveaway and Q&A. The chance to enter and ask me any questions ends in less than a week, on the 1st of December at midnight GMT. For more information you can check out my original post here.