Discussion Time: Why Trigger Warnings are Really Important

I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not the best at including trigger warnings in my reviews, but I’m trying to be better at it because it’s so important that readers are aware of the dangerous parts of certain books that could make their reading experience an uncomfortable one. Granted I don’t know if it’s possible to encompass everything that could be a trigger, but I guess that’s what the rest of the review is for.

The only thing is, how do you include trigger warnings that count as spoilers? Sometimes the part of the book that could trigger someone happens at the end, or it’s what the story and character development have been building up to, and for someone who isn’t triggered it would ruin the book. How do you navigate that dilemma?

Why Trigger Warnings are Really Important

Why Trigger Warnings are Really Important

Fair warning; I talk a fair bit about topics that could be considered triggering in this post, mainly suicide.

It’s hard to know what will trigger a person. For some people mentions of rape or heavy violence may be triggering whereas for others it’s just part of the story, they can accept it happening to the characters and move onto the next chapter with no issues. For some people the act of suicide in books can leave them uncomfortable and nauseous but for others it’s no big deal.


One of the things I can read is the act of suicide (I’m not going to go into the reasons behind this, that’s getting a little too personal for the moment but you can probably make an educated guess as to why). I don’t mind reading characters who have thoughts of suicide, but the second those thoughts cross over into the act I can’t handle it.

For the most part reading All the Bright Places was fine, I thought it was a great read. I loved the story, the journey Finch and Violet were on exploring all the natural wonders of their state, and I even liked that these two broken characters were gravitating to one another. Maybe someone else could have seen the way the story was going considering Finch’s state of mind but I couldn’t.

all-the-bright-places

Suicide happens in All the Bright Places, and it happens late enough in the story that a trigger warning would have been considered a spoiler, but if I’d known before starting that one of the main characters would kill themselves three quarters of the way through I would not have picked this up. I was left feeling uncomfortable and strangely devastated having to read what I did, and I would hate for anyone else to have to feel that way because they went into this book (or any book for that matter) unprepared.


In my opinion, and speaking from my own experience, I think people who are affected by the things we include trigger warnings for they don’t care about spoilers. They care about having a book they can read that make them think, not makes them nauseous; they want a story that takes them to a new world, not leaves them uncomfortable.

Books I’ve included trigger warnings for in my reviews were those by Christina Henry; Alice, Red Queen, Lost Boy. They were all amazing reads, I think I rated them four or five stars each, but they are very dark and brutal, and Alice includes flashback to rape. For me that wasn’t anything more than part of the story, but I know for someone else the violence or the rape flashback could be a major no-go. Granted I don’t think these warnings were spoiler-y at all so it’s not quite the same situation as with All the Bright Places bit at the end of the day a trigger warning is a trigger warning.

The Chronicles of Alice

Lost Boy


I think it’s important we have books that discuss these things. Maybe All the Bright Places was a triggering read for me, but for someone else out there it could have really helped them. Like seeing more minority main characters and religions represent it’s important to have stories discussing topics like rape and suicide, but that doesn’t mean reading them is what everyone wants.

Trigger warnings enable someone to decide whether a book is safe for them to read, it helps them create an environment they are comfortable with and warn them something they may be uncomfortable with is coming. If I had known going into All the Bright Places one of the main characters committed suicide would I still have read it? I can’t say but I think I possibly would have because I would have been prepared for what was coming instead of emotionally blindsided by it.


Now Onto the Discussion Part of This Post:

What are your opinion on trigger warnings?

Have you ever been ‘saved’ from a book because of the trigger warning included? (If this is too personal please don’t answer it).

Do you include trigger warnings in your reviews, and would you still include them in if it counted as a spoiler?

Have you even been blindsided by a book the way I was by All the Bright Places? ( Again, if this is too personal please don’t answer it).

Let me know in the comments below.

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89 thoughts on “Discussion Time: Why Trigger Warnings are Really Important

  1. I completely agree with you on this. As someone who deals with mental illness, I think it’s important to do so because I have had to stop reading some books due to unmentioned triggers. For me it’s suicide, sometimes it can go over my head but other times it can be too difficult to continue reading.
    As for reviews, I still include any possible trigger even if someone might say it’s a spoiler. Sometimes these triggers can be mentioned again or repeated throughout the book and what not.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s suicide for me too, and I completely get what you mean. It can be hard to tell without actually reading what mentions of the trigger will actually trigger you, but by then it’s too late, you’ve already read it.
      I’d do the same, I’ve said myself I’d rather be spoiled than triggered, and I’m going to assume it’s the same for a lot of people out there.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I don’t think that trigger warning ca be seen as spoiler. Also because possibile trigger events can be: repeated mentions, topic graphic event, a simple discussion… Everything and nothing.

    I saw some people give a generic statement about the triggers that are inside the book, while others where a bit more specific, and other again had even the page number when things happened.

    Personally I don’t get triggered by books that often, but since you bring out All The Bright Places… I liked it, even if other people percived the book in a totally different way from mine. Finch’s experience talked in some way to mine, but I realized that the book had what can looks like a trigger reaction for two days after having finished the book. I cried a lot and… wasn’t plesant.

    So, the important for me is that people should be aware of what they’re going to read. Some people will still pick it up because they know. Personally I’m one of them, but I like to know that my fellow bookworm are safe.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah I think that’s how a lot of people feel about it. Personally I think nine times out of ten trigger warnings won’t be a spoiler but I’m leaving that one time out of ten as a just in case.
      Oh the page number thing could be helpful, that way you can still enjoy most of the book and know exactly where the trigger is you want to avoid.
      In most ways I do think AtBP is a good book, just because the subject matter and the suicide wasn’t something I was prepared for it ended up making me too uncomfortable to have enjoyed reading it. I’m glad there were parts of Finch’s character you could relate to, but the two days after sound horrible so I’m sorry you had I experience that.
      Definitely, I’m probably one of the other people, those who won’t pick a book up if it could trigger me, but either way no one should have to go into a story unprepared for something that could trigger them.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I think trigger warnings are very important! Books are a means for people to escape reality and enjoy themselves, so obviously they would want to know if something within that book will trigger them.
    Personally I’m trying to get better at including trigger warnings into my reviews. Though I have a bit of a problem with that, as I don’t really have any triggers (not that I’m aware of at least). So sometimes recognising the triggering parts is hard – excluding, of course, the very obvious ones like suicide, rape. But I’m trying to get better at that.
    Also, I don’t consider trigger warnings to be a spoiler. Just don’t mention to which character that triggering event happens to, when in the book and so on. Just knowing that a traumatic event is part of a book does not make it a spoiler.
    Amazing discussion Beth! ❤ 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh definitely, I read books to escape from everything and if I’m made uncomfortable by trigger warnings it kind of defeats the purpose of reading at all. Yeah I’m the same, the thing is I know firsthand how damaging it can be when they’re not included because it happened to me so I know how they need to be in reviews, I just have a memory like a sieve.
      I think as it is it’s going to be hard to include every thing that could count as trigger, the only thing we can do is our best right?
      Thanks so much Anna! 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  4. This is an amazing post. I agree with everything you said. I feel like it’s either authors don’t understand or they forget how important trigger warnings are. There’s absolutely nothing worse than a person reading a book, then going into a relapse. Triggering content, in the long run, can be so harmful to a lot of people. It doesn’t matter if you have ever had that specific event happen to you or that specific mental illness, it can still trigger something within you.
    I also always make sure to leave a trigger warning in my reviews. Since I just started this blog, I don’t have many reviews up. But in my review for It Ends With Us and Eliza And Her Monsters, I made sure to include warnings. Even if it does contain a spoiler, I’ll definitely still include it. I mean nothing is more important than someone’s health!
    I feel like if authors themselves don’t leave trigger warnings, us as bloggers definitely should. Because reality is, we’re a big community/family here and we should support and take care of one another! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much. I’d like to think authors understand trigger warnings, I mean they’re writing things which could have a bad affect on readers so I hope they understand them, but maybe they don’t realise how important they actually are. It’s definitely harmful, and I think more needs to be done to warn people about them, not just reviewers including trigger warnings in our books you know? We can only do so much.
      Yeah I remember reading Eliza and Her Monsters and I know the scene you’re thinking of when it comes to trigger warnings. I definitely need to do more work when it comes to including trigger warnings in my reviews. After everything I’ve written in this post and everything everyone has said in the comments I know it’s so important to include them.
      Oh definitely, but at the same time it shouldn’t be solely us. I think it would be good if publishers were more involved in warning readers of potential harmful content. At the end of the day reviewers could miss triggering content, but publishers shouldn’t. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Trigger warnings are super important. I don’t include them as often as I do though. Everyone gets triggered by a certain thing. If it’s an integral part or I feel it’s emotional, I would include it. I have never been saved by a trigger warning. I do know that some books trigger me and I would still read it. Thirteen Reasons Why for example. Her self deprecating herself hit too close to home. But I would probably still read it but it’s nice to be aware.

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    1. Yeah this post was all about how important I think trigger warnings are but I rarely include them as well. I think sometimes with triggers in books if you’re not aware it’s the surprise that makes it worse you know, not being able to prepare yourself for something you know is going to make for uncomfortable reading. 13 Reasons Why is one book/TV series I won’t be starting I have to say, just because of what it deals with and my own personal triggers. That book is not going to be for me unfortunately.

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      1. The TV show is so triggering it’s insane. Netflix actually had to have the cast put an actual trigger warning because of so many complaints. It was just a thing I would watch once. I wouldn’t watch it again. And I read the book twice. While my opinion has changed, it just gave me a whole swell of emotions. Your mental health is more important so I think you’re better off with better portrayal of depression. It does romanticize suicide and it makes you seem like such a great thing.

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      2. Yeah when the first season was released I saw so much on the news about it; about how schools were warning students who had seen it, and about copycat acts of suicide based on Hannah’s especially. I wouldn’t even watch it once, like you said mental health is more important and I know that is a show that would just end up hurting more than helping.

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      3. Exactly. Understandable. I still wanted to watch it to see the hype but I made sure not to watch it alone. I watched it with my best friend so I don’t get lost in my thoughts. The ending was terrible. It was so triggering and my friend had to avert her eyes. I would not watch it again. Just watch happier shows that deal with mental health. I recommend Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. It has songs and it starts off slow but once you get into it, you’re in it.

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      4. A few of my friends were talking about how good it was (I think more in terms of the storyline than the more triggering things) but they also mentioned how triggering and potentially harmful it was. I’m just not interested in that at all. I have heard good things about Crazy Ex-Girlfriend though.

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      5. I guess the storyline is addicting but I honestly do not care what happens to them. I was just interested to see how well the adaptation was and it was done well (except for the ending). Just thinking about it is making me uncomfortable. Some scenes will never leave my mind. And those aren’t a trigger for me but it’s intense. Imagine for someone who is triggered by those. It would be horrifying for them.

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      6. God I can almost imagine, what I have seen in trailers makes it seem like a very fast-paced and addictive show but also a show that has a lot of ‘shock value’. It’s not going to be for everyone I just hope it’s not too damaging of someone goes into it unprepared.

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  6. Great post!! I always try to include trigger warnings in my Reviews, even though sometimes I fear that I won’t catch every single thing – but I really try to 🙂 I think that there is also a content warning database, which is super helpful! It’s always a bit more tricky with books where the TW’s have to do with a later plot point. I still list them, but the alternative would be to list them under a spoiler Tag, maybe?

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    1. Thanks so much Caro. Yeah when it comes down to it I don’t know if we’ll ever be able to include every potential trigger in our reviews but we’re only human after all. Like you said you try, and that’s all we can do. 🙂
      Ohh, I imagine that content warning database is really helpful.
      I think I’d list them under spoilers that way it’s down to readers to decide, but like I’ve said in other comments I’d rather a book spoiled for me than be caught out by something that would make me really uncomfortable while reading.

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  7. Hello Beth 🙂
    I’ve been looking forward to reading this post since you’ve mentioned a while back that you were going to write about trigger warnings. You make a great point that trigger warnings are so important and they should be incorporated for all novels that have triggering content.
    I don’t think trigger warnings should be considered spoilers. I think some other bloggers have mentioned before that books shouldn’t rely on triggering events as a plot twist, therefore trigger warnings shouldn’t be spoilers. I don’t think I want to read a book where the central plot twist revolves around suicide or rape- not only would it be disturbing, it doesn’t sound like a well-crafted story.
    I agree that readers should be informed about triggers so that we can decide not to read a book if we want to avoid a potential trigger. It will save a lot of people a lot of time and heartache, I think.
    We talked a bit about All the Bright Places before. I didn’t enjoy this book either. Although I didn’t feel triggered by the ending, it was quite depressing and in general not a satisfying ending.

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    1. Well in that case I hope this post was one you enjoyed. 🙂 But yeah I’m not sure why I started thinking about trigger warnings again (it’s been a while since I read AtBP) but they’ve been on my mind so I wrote and posted this. Oh definitely, any book that uses something triggering as a plot twist is not a story I want to read either (I can’t imagine how it could be done that doesn’t come off as insensitive and kind of tacky). I guess it depends what people view as spoilers you know. I feel like because of the way it happened in AtBP the trigger warning could end up being a spoiler for some readers.
      Definitely, and I’ve said a few times in other comments when it comes to trigger warnings I’d rather a book be spoiled for me than read something that makes me feel the way AtBP did.
      Yeah, I know all her books aren’t going to be the same but AtBP kind of put me off that authors work all together. I think any more of her books I pick up are just going to remind me of that one and it’s not something I want to re-experience.

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      1. Yeah I can see how some readers may see the trigger warning as a spoiler, especially for a book like AtBP. I assumed that the guy would survive at the end, until it dawned on me that he didn’t. This was the biggest surprise of the book and a trigger warning would have lessened that surprise. However a trigger warning would NOT have lessened my enjoyment of the book (if that makes sense! double negatives always confuse me!) and I agree that readers should be warned about this ending.
        I am wondering if a good compromise is a general trigger warning that doesn’t give away any details, like “this book contains content related to suicide and suicidal ideation”. Do you think this can appeal to both sides of the argument, or would you prefer a more specific trigger warning?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yeah, and if someone had triggered the book with something like ‘acts of suicide’ instead of just ‘mentions’ I feel like it would be easy to guess which character ended up taking their own lives and it would lessen some aspect of the emotional punch when you realise what he’s done in AtBP.
        I don’t think it would have spoiled my enjoyment either (actually based on what I’ve written in this post and in previous comments it may have helped me enjoy the book more in the end). I think yeah that could be a good compromise, for me though my trigger isn’t so much talk of suicide but the act itself, kind of a tricky line to walk when it comes to trigger warnings I suppose.

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      3. In that case I do agree that trigger warnings should be more specific rather than vague. It does sound like in this case a more specific trigger warning might have helped you enjoy the book more. Authors should value the emotional well-being of their readers more than the “punch” of their plot twist, right?
        Do you often see trigger warnings on books? Maybe I’m missing it but I never see trigger warnings on the books themselves (though I see it in the reviews that some bloggers post). I sometimes get the sense that there could be sexual abuse or acts of suicide based on the Goodreads description, but often this takes me by surprise.

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      4. Yeah it would have, and if you think about it as well when it comes to individual people’s triggers they are all different. A lot of people will be triggered by things like suicide or rape but there are different degrees, and one book someone may be fine with won’t be fine for someone else even though they have the ‘same’ trigger.
        Well, no I never see them on books either, not that I can remember at any rate! Like you I’ve always used the Goodreads description to judge, more so than reviews because sometimes if it’s a book I’m really excited for I don’t want any spoilers, even in the form of a non-spoiler review.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. That’s a good point that people vary in their degree of sensitivity towards triggers. Ideally trigger warnings should be specific enough so that the reader can make an accurate assessment before beginning a book!
        That’s unfortunate that books don’t incorporate trigger warnings. So far I’ve only seen them in online novels (like wattpad.) It should be implemented more widely!

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  8. I like your post!

    I’m the same way: I believe trigger/content warnings are extremely important! We want everyone to be able to have a good time while reading, and that may mean giving a warning before they read a novel that there may be triggering content.

    I do my best to keep a running list of triggers for books I’m reading so I can remember to put them in my review later on. And I usually do the more “common” triggers: rape, suicide, self-harm, any forms of abuse, death, homomisia, transmisia, racism, etc.

    I have to say, though, that I don’t see trigger/content warnings as spoilers, even if said warnings are about the protagonist(s). For example, if you (in general, not you specifically) just have “Trigger warning: character death, rape, spousal abuse”, I wouldn’t count that as a spoiler. You aren’t giving any details away. And honestly? I’m hurt that triggering things such as rape are used as “plot twists.” It kind of disgusts me? But I digress.

    If it isn’t obvious already, I do try to include as many potential triggers/content warnings as possible in my reviews. I try to keep an eye out for the more “uncommon” triggers, if I can, but I feel like I do mess up and forget some of them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much. Yes the main reason we all read is because we love it, no one really wants to be caught unaware by something that would make the uncomfortable because it was have such a lasting impact, beyond just reaching the end of the book you know?
      That’s a good idea, and I guess that ensures you don’t forget any of the triggers you come across either? I write my reviews a few days after I’ve read the book, I feel like by that point I’ll have forgotten some of the triggers I came across while reading.
      Oh I definitely get what you mean, books where triggering actions like rape/suicide are used as plot twists are books I am not a fan of (beyond the fact that the latter of those two is my trigger). It’s a cheap way to elicit a reaction and it’s just not right. I suppose yeah when it comes to trigger warnings they aren’t really spoiler-y, but if it comes down to it and the choice is spoiler-free or trigger-warning I’d rather see trigger-warning, no doubt about it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, exactly!

        Of course, right when I say I keep track of triggers, I just finished a review realizing I didn’t make a list as I was reading…. whoops, lol. I tried my best to remember them all, though.

        Yeah, I’m agreeing to everything you’re saying, lol. It’s spot-on.

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  9. What a wonderful discussion Beth, I really liked reading your opinion on this topic and I definitely think trigger warnings are super important.

    I think when I started reviewing trigger warnings weren’t really prominent in my mind, and being someone who isn’t triggered often, I found it hard to identify triggers. However, after reviewing for two years and being within the community for so long, I know how important they are and I would never want to recommend a book that would be harmful to someone else, without giving them knowledge of the trigger. All my reviews are normally spoiler free, and I do include trigger warnings, they are normally right at the top before my review is given.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Bex. 🙂 Yeah I feel like for a lot of people trigger warnings are something included in reviews but not really mentioned much beyond that.
      It’s definitely good you don’t have any triggers (I hope you don’t come across any in the near future either) and yeah the more time you spend in the community the more you become aware of these things. I know after blogging as long as I have been I’ve become more critical in my reviews and I pick up on things like triggers more now than when I was first starting out.
      Majority of my reviews are spoiler free too, but there are ways to include trigger warnings without spoilers. I think the main thing I was getting at with this post was what do you do when the trigger warning would be a spoiler? It’s that that kind of left me unprepared for AtBP.

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  10. this blog post is so important and helpful!!!!!! I always forget to include trigger warnings, but now I’m definitely making it more of a priority because there have been so many times I would have loved a warning, or my friends have mentioned wishing they handn’t read certain things.
    **like w Looking for Alaska,,,I was so emotionally devastated**
    I don’t have too many triggers, but my little sister is 18 and she’s extremely sensitive to topics such as sexual harassment and I always love for her to feel prepared for that going into books ❤
    I think Goodreads should have trigger warnings if they don't already!! c: c:

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Malanie. 🙂 Yeah there are a couple of books I doubted I would have picked up if there’d be trigger warnings, AtBP is the main one though.
      Yeah subjects like sexual harassment is one of the main triggers, or the one that affects more people than some of the others. It’s so important people are made aware of things like that so they can prepare for what the book will bring up.
      Ohh, I’m not sure if they do already but if not that would be a great idea! 🙂 ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I think trigger warnings are important as it could mean someone spent his money on a book he will not finish. But if it’s a spoiler I would not give it or hide it.

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  12. I really love this post, such an important discussion to have. I think that trigger warnings are really important to include, because we never know what we get into and some topics might be very triggering for some readers and it’s only fair that they should know in advance what they are getting into, in order to preserve their well-being. I always try to include trigger warnings in my reviews and do my best to do a little research in order not to forget one, but I’m always scared to forget one trigger somewhere, that I didn’t see or just forgot because it was not triggering for me and my memory sometimes suck. That being said, I do think it’s so important to pay attention to these things and I wish that publishers paid more attention to that and included potential triggers in the books 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much Marie. 🙂 Yeah definitely definitely important, and after it happened to me with AtBP I don’t want to make another reader go through the same thing because they weren’t aware in a book they think they’ll enjoy. It should be down to the reader to choose whether they pick up a book that includes uncomfortable topics for them, not something they’re forced into because there was no warnings to make them aware. I always see the trigger warnings at the end if your reviews, and you’re going a better job than I am. At the end of the day we’re only human, we may forget one or two but it would be better if the authors or publishers paid more attention like you said and included warnings in the books themselves. You always see that legal speak on the first page, about how any resemblance to real people is purely a coincidence, so why can’t they include something on triggers for the readers? 🙂

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      1. Yes honestly that would be very, very amazing if that became, standard practice in the book industry – they are so, so useful for many readers and so important, too! 🙂

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  13. I think this is a wonderful discussion topic because it’s so important! There’s not really anything for me that I think I could consider a trigger, but I do often like knowing what I’m getting into if a book is going to be too dark and I know how important it is to have labels on things for those that are triggered by upsetting topics like rape or suicide, so I do try to include the warnings as much as possible.

    For the most part, I try to post spoiler-free reviews, and I know it can be rough to navigate that with trigger warnings, like you mentioned. Thus, I try to separate my trigger warnings and just include them at the beginning or end of my review, not really in any section where I might accidentally give something away based on the trigger. I also try to keep them descriptive enough that they’re a warning, but still vague enough that I hopefully don’t give too much away. For example, I might say something like “This book features characters discussing suicide as well as descriptions of drug use and themes of abuse.” That sentence hopefully gives someone who might be triggered enough information to know whether the book is for them or not, and I think it’s still vague enough that it doesn’t give too much away.

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    1. Oh yeah, someone else mentioned something like that because there are a few dark books out there which you wouldn’t think were that dark based on the cover/blurb. I feel as well even if people aren’t triggered as such it’s nice to be prepared if the story does get gruesome, just so you can judge for yourself almost.
      That’s a good way of including it, and granted I can’t tell what book you may be referring to with that example warning but I wouldn’t have thought that would include any spoilers. I guess it depends what the trigger is and where it appears in the book. Sometimes there are stories that revolve around the act of rape or suicide and it’s only through the development of the character that we realise what happened to them (if it was rape) or what they were moving towards (if it’s suicide). So the question is how do you trigger warning those events when it potentially reveals something that could be considered a spoiler? I mean I don’t know the answer to that question but in my opinion better to include trigger warnings than not, no matter how spoiler-y. 🙂

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      1. Yeah, I think in the scenario you mentioned where the trigger warning is definitely a spoiler, it’s best to still include it but maybe preface it with something beforehand like “Trigger warnings follow, but don’t read if you don’t want spoilers.”

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  14. I do understand the importance of trigger warnings, even though I don’t believe I have any myself .I include them as often as I can, even though I mostly label them as content warnings. The thing I struggle is, is what constitutes a trigger? As you mentioned what might be harmful for one person, is something another person just casually reads over. So, I want to be thorough when I give these warnings, but at the same time I feel overwhelmed with the possibility of letting someone down by forgetting something crucial that just might not have crossed my mind that moment (also, I am quite forgetful about details in stories to be honest).
    I think it’s a bit unfair to reviewers to have to figure this out yourself. There are a couple publishers who give content warnings and I’d be much happier if that was just a standard thing, even if it might be spoilery. The thing is, if you don’t feel like might be triggered by certain topics, you don’t have to check the warnings anyway.
    I hope this rambly mess made sense!

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    1. I guess it’s good you don’t have any triggers, here’s hoping you don’t discover any as well. 🙂 I need to be better at including them in my reviews, honestly I have no excuse because I know how horrible it is coming across something you’re triggered by unprepared for it. Yeah I completely get what you mean, and I don’t think there’s any way to include warnings for every trigger out there but without having a warning longer than the review we’ve written but at the end of the day all we can do is our best right?
      It would be great if publishers did do this as an industry standard, and that way we wouldn’t worry about forgetting them in our reviews either (which I’d totally do as well), but I know what you mean because I feel like when I first picked up AtBP I wouldn’t have checked if the publisher had included that trigger warning in the book itself. It was only when I read it that I realised you know?
      (It made sense, I hope my reply did too!)

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      1. (Yay, I do worry about babbling and sometimes I wonder if my answers only make sense to me).
        I feel like if we as bloggers take the first step hopefully we’ll see that chance in the industry too. I mean it may be slow coming but progress is something isn’t it?

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  15. I think the same as you! Though I don’t mind reading about specific topics and don’t mind reading trigger warnings, there are a few books that I would like to know about them, Karrin Slaughter books for example. Everyone says they have lots of trigger and content warnings, but most of the people don’t tell them in their reviews because they are spoilers, which sucks because I want to know those before going into said books.
    I think content and trigger warnings are very helpful and important for readers to be aware of, because not all are confortable reading about the same things.

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    1. Yeah there are some things I’m not triggered by, and that I have no issue reading, that I know would make other people uncomfortable. I don’t think it’s easy to say what can trigger someone else but people need to have the option of knowing what they’re going into just in case. That’s the thing isn’t it, you’d rather be spoiled for those books but know what you’re reading, especially if it’s that dark, I’m the same (I feel like most people with triggers would be similar.)

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m sorry if you feel that way while reading AtBP, I myself realized I didn’t put trigger warnings on my review. I think trigger warnings are important, more important than the consideration whether it will the spoil or not, since it could hurt/trigger someone. I admit I need to do better with including trigger warnings in my reviews, but I think it’s very important.

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    1. Looking back I can’t remember if I put a trigger warning on my review either (I spoke about what happened in a spoiler section so it was there I remember that). Yeah I was just saying to someone else I’d rather have a story spoiled for me that go unaware into something that would trigger me. In the end it’s down to the reader I think, but they should have that option of knowing what they’re reading no matter how spoiler-y it may be.
      I need to do better with trigger warnings too, I’m just gonna say it’s a resolution of mine from this point onwards. 🙂

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  17. I personally don’t experience a lot of triggers, and I definitely need to work on including more of them in my reviews! I love that we’re having this discussion because including these warnings can potentially save a reader from anxiety/other unwanted negative emotions. I’ve also had the problem where triggers are very spoiler-y, so when that happens, the best I can do is mark the warnings as a spoiler. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think it’s great you don’t experience a lot of triggers, I wish I could say the same, I can definitely say the same that I need to work on including them in my reviews more. 🙂 Yeah this was something I needed to write just to get my thoughts out there. It’s been ages since I picked up AtBP but I still remember how horrible it was reading that scene when I wasn’t prepared for it. I feel like personally I’d rather a book spoiled than be caught unaware again by something I’m so uncomfortable reading. ❤️

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I completely agree! 💖I always open trigger warnings marked as spoiler tags because I want to make sure I’m okay with everything going down in the book. My heart goes out to everyone who has to suffer through trigger—reading should be an amazing experience, not something that leaves people uncomfortable/unhappy, which is why those warnings are so important </3

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It’s better to be safe than sorry, because getting caught unprepared by a trigger is worse than being spoiled for a book.
        I mean from my perspective reading is an amazing experience 9.99 times out of ten. It’s just in cases like with AtBP which make up the 0.01 but they’re rare. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Totally! Like I said, I don’t experience that many triggers which I’m super grateful for, but one of mine is graphic descriptions of self-harm (when it involves cutting and blood). Even typing that makes me feel gross, argh )’: I can’t imagine how icky it would make me feel if I suddenly got confronted with a scene that involved very detailed self-harm (which is why I’m avoiding the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why at all costs, HAHA) ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Oh I get what you mean. I think a couple of my friends are like that, they’re not a massive fan of blood so while they can read battle scenes like you tend to get in fantasy books anything graphic in the way self harm can be is a big no-no for them.
        I’m avoiding 13 Reasons Why, pretty much for the suicide aspect, I’ve heard bad things about how it’s dangerously portrayed in the show and I’ve got no interest in that.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Yeahh I’ve read a lot about the controversy surrounding 13RW… although they have added a trigger warning, I can see how it might be glamorizing self-harm without ever discussing depression in-depth. :// I’ve actually watched the first episode recently and tbh, definitely not a fan.

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  18. It’s a real dilemma. Basically, if the author hasn’t revealed rape, suicide etc I think they prefer that it isn’t revealed. I do put a warning ‘this book isn’t for everyone’ but it’s not really enough. Maybe authors should warn of triggers themselves to take the responsibilty away from the book reviewer. As you say some violent acts would traumatise some readers but others might accept it as part of the storyline. If the book cover leads the reader to think it is a light read but its gritty or dark. I would definitely point this out. A great debate topic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah I get what you mean, but it’s the fact that someone reading the book could be made really uncomfortable if they are triggered by one of those things and they’re unprepared for it that makes it a fine line to walk. It would be great if the authors did include warnings (someone previously mentioned they could put them at the end of the book, so if people at need a warning they know where to find it but people who don’t won’t get spoiled) but until then I guess it’s just down to our own research and reviews. Maybe if I’d read more reviews for AtBP I’d have known what was coming and I wouldn’t have picked it up after all, who knows?
      Thanks so much. 🙂

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  19. I’ve been blindsided by countless books because a lot of times abuse isn’t included in trigger warnings. I’ve been left having panic attacks due to the content and I get frustrated. Additionally I also have a trigger with epilepsy, due to my mum’s diagnosis, so when that occasionally springs up in a book I’m never ready. The Cruel Prince, A List or Cages and The Gentlemen’s Guide to Vice and Virtue are some that have left me triggered. I love this discussion, though I disagree with you about triggers being a spoiler though. You talk about All The Bright Places, a book I did hate, but I don’t think saying there is suicide in the book is a spoiler. I don’t know though, this is just me. You don’t tell the reader who or when or why, which is obviously big parts of when the triggers occur. Great discussion though!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh that sucks, but it kind of surprises me abuse isn’t considered something to provide a trigger warning for you know? I imagine there are a few people out there who are triggered by it. The idea of having a panic attack because of something I’ve read scares me, and the fact that reading could cause something like that is terrible in and of itself because reading is something we do for fun because we enjoy it. It shouldn’t be causing any kind of discomfort.
      I think with All the Bright Places it wasn’t so much the mentions of suicide that triggered me, I’m fine reading books that talk about it, it was the fact that one of the main characters committed suicide that made me so uncomfortable. And that’s why I think it could potentially be spoiler-y because it would have to reveal that someone committed suicide in the book and you’d likely be able to guess which of the characters in the story it affected. I dunno, that’s just my thoughts on it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I don’t experience heavy triggers, but I don’t like it when book go too dark. So honestly I’m glad that you mentioned these things about books! I experienced it with A List of Cages, it was much more creepy and horrible than I was prepared for. In my opinion every book with possible triggers should have a list of the triggers in the back of the book (after the author’s note for example). Because I do understand that people who don’t have these triggers don’t want possible spoilers all over the cover of a book for example.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Having a list after the authors note sounds like an amazing solution! You don’t have to look there if you don’t have triggers and don’t want spoilers, but the info is there for those who need it!

      Goodreads could even start including a section or a box to click for certain trigger warnings. That would make it easy too, even if you don’t have the book in your hands.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you! But I have no idea how to get publishers to do this. Goodreads should totally do that too! Just a separate section within the books page that you can click, where you can read trigger warnings or triggers that some people experienced :). I wish they would do that!

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Yeah I think even if people aren’t triggered by certain topics seeing them come up in a book and being unprepared for them can still be an unpleasant surprise, especially if the cover or blurb is misleading you know? I think having them at the end of the book (after the authors note like you said) is a good idea. That way people that don’t want to be spoiled won’t but people who need the warning know where to find it. It would certainly have been helpful for me when it came to AtBP.

      Liked by 1 person

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