Top Ten Tuesday: Frequently Used Title Structures for Young Adult Fantasy Books

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted byย That Artsy Reader Girl. Each week there is a new topic for bloggers to choose and list their top ten. This week’s theme is Frequently Used Title Structures for Young Adult Fantasy Books.

This was always something part of me noticed, but that until this Top Ten Tuesday topic I never paid too much attention to. Now I have and it’s become something I can’t get my mind to un-notice.

When it comes to young adult book titles, especially in the fantasy genre, there’s a common structure that seems to be everywhere; ‘[Something] of [Something] and [Something]’. The titles below aren’t even all the ones I was able to find, they’re just all the ones I managed to find before my brain started melting down.


Top Ten Tuesday

It’s something you see a lot in Laini Taylor’s books. In fact the only book where the title doesn’t have that specific structure is Strange the Dreamer. One book out of six releases.

Laini Taylor

Muse of Nightmares


Another author who uses the same, or similar, structures for book titles is Cassandra Clare. Granted a lot of her releases are ‘[Something] of [Something]’ rather than ‘[Something] of [Something] and [Something]’ but they still all count for the purpose of this post.

In fact the whole of The Mortal Instruments series.

Cassandra Clare (1)

Cassandra Clare (2)


Miscellaneous (2)


Sarah J. Maas has used the ‘[Something] of [Something]’ title structure for her Throne of Glass series.

Sarah J Maas


And Rick Riordan started doing the same with his Heroes of Olympus series.

Rick Riordan


Miscellaneous (1)


So what do you think? Did you take part in this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, if so let me know what common words or title structures you see in the books you read. Is your brain as battered as mine after reading this post, is this something you’re ever going to be able to un-notice?

If the answer is no I clearly haven’t done the job I set out to do with this post.

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40 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: Frequently Used Title Structures for Young Adult Fantasy Books

  1. Ooh I love the way to play this week’s topic, instead of using the keyword you are using the structure ๐Ÿ˜€ I think for Clare, Taylor, and Riordan are because they are in the same series. TMI using the City of [something], TID using Clockwork [something]… But the format became very overused in YA, especially since most YA titles are incorporating the same word over and over again?? I find myself confusing one book for another more than once!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much. ๐Ÿ™‚ Yeah I struggled to think of one word but I realised there were a lot of books with the same structure. Granted it makes sense in series, and connects the books, but then you look at it kind of in terms of the genre overall and realise how overused it can be.
      Oh Iโ€™ve done that a couple of times. I was actually 100% convinced Iโ€™d read a book Iโ€™d actually never picked up before just because the two titles were so similar. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  2. Oh my god, thatโ€™s so weird? I think I always noticed it (like in TMI and DoSaB because they were series and I guessed that they were meant to be that way) but I never saw it with Throne of Glass or Heroes of Olympus?? Thatโ€™s so weird!

    And I feel like a lot of books have “of” in them these days, for some reason. One pattern Iโ€™ve found is with “girl”, “made”, and “of”. For example, Girls Made of Snow and Glass, Girl Made of Stars, and Girls of Paper and Fire. (I feel like I messed up all of those titles now. ๐Ÿ˜‚)

    Great post, Beth!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah in series it makes sense because it’s a way of connecting the books isn’t it? Honestly I just never realised how many books had this title structure, I kind of noticed them separately but never together you know?
      Ha, I’m not sure if those are the correct titles but I know what books you mean and yeah there are a lot of titles with that pattern too.
      Thanks so much May. ๐Ÿ˜€

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    1. Yeah the things Iโ€™ve realised thanks to this weeks TTT theme is kind of funny. Itโ€™s strange how you donโ€™t tend to notice until someone else points it out right?
      Ha, yeah I said that myself, this is kind of a do-not guide for naming your own novel. ๐Ÿ˜€

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  3. Oh yes, you’re right! It’s impossible to unsee it once you point it out!! I’ve got to admit that I’m a bit of a fan of this particular structure- even if it is everywhere right now ๐Ÿ˜‰ But well spotted!
    Excellent post! ๐Ÿ˜€ โค

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, and I feel like now I have pointed it out Iโ€™m going to be seeing it everywhere, even more than I would have before! It works well for YA fantasy books for sure, I mean itโ€™s everywhere so it must be a successful formula for a title! ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks so much. ๐Ÿ™‚ โค๏ธ

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It really is something we can’t un-notice now…. thank you for that, Beth! With this week’s topic, I noticed all of the patterns in YA book-titles and now… I’m just seeing it everywhere, the similarities, the names, everything looks the same and I am having an existential crisis about it all hahahaha.
    Fantastic post! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha, that all right. ๐Ÿ˜€ And yeah I get what you mean because there are a few things that are going to stay stuck in my mind now from this week’s theme. It really is something you don’t tend to notice until it’s pointed out like this, then you just can’t ignore it. Existential crisis sounds about right! Does give me some ideas about what not to name my WIP though . ๐Ÿ™‚
      Thanks so much. ๐Ÿ˜€ โค

      Liked by 1 person

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