Discussion Time: The Pros and Cons of Retellings

This is a topic that has been floating around in my mind ever since I posted a Top Ten Tuesday topic a little while ago on fairytales I’d love to see retold more. I am a massive fan of fairytale retellings, and most retellings actually; all a book needs to do is hint at the fact that it’s a retelling and it’s an automatic add to my to-read list.

However that doesn’t mean I think all retellings are amazing, and that all I read are given five star ratings and should be read by everyone. Retellings, be they fairytale or not, aren’t for everyone, and there have even been a fair few fairytale retellings I haven’t enjoyed at all.

The Pros and Cons of Retellings

The Pros and Cons of Retellings

When it comes down to it I’m not 100% sure why I love retellings so much. It’s as hard to explain as it would be explaining why I love fantasy or sci-fi books so much. There’s no short answer and I could spend hours trying to put the words in order to properly describe why.


Pros

The Nostalgia

This is a big one for me, and likely the main reason. Every time I pick up a book that retells the story of Alice in Wonderland or Cinderella it brings back memories from my childhood of watching the Disney films with my sister, or reading the stories from an old and tattered copy of fairytales. The retellings aren’t all the same, but they do all have that common thread that brings back those memories in one way or another.

The Originality

You can have a hundred retellings of Beauty and the Beast, and actually I think there are more Beauty and the Beast retellings out there than any other, but no two are the same. Some authors choose to stick closer to the original tale, Hunted by Meagan Spooner, whereas others use the story as a foundation to create something completely new, A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J Maas.

The Pros and Cons of Retellings - The Originality


Cons

The Structure

Nine times out of ten you know how retellings are going to end, especially if you’ve read the original story. Granted reading is as much about the whole book as it is the last few chapters, but I know there are people out there who likely don’t enjoy retellings because they like to be surprised be the end. When I picked up HeartlessΒ  by Marissa Meyer, I knew even before starting the book how the story would end for Cath; not with a happily ever after.

heartless

The Lack of Options

There are so many retellings out there for Beauty and the Beast, and some of the other really popular fairytales, but there are so many other stories out there that have the potential to be retold. In the run up to the release of Flame in the Mist by Renee Ahdieh I spoke to more than a few people who said that one of the main reasons they were so excited for this book was because it was a Mulan retelling; a story that hadn’t been retold much before, if at all.

flame-in-the-mist

You can only read retellings of Beauty and the Beast so many times, no matter how unique the concept of each is, before you start getting a little bored.


Like I said earlier I am a massive fan of retellings, and it doesn’t matter what kind they are. Be they stories that expand more on the original, like The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller, or stories that use the original tales as a foundation for a completely unique story, like Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson series, I will read them all. However that doesn’t mean I’m blind to the cons, and just because a book is a retelling doesn’t mean I’m guaranteed to love it.

The Pros and Cons of Retellings - Conclusion

There are a fair few retellings out there I haven’t enjoyed; because of the plot, or the writing, or the characters. For me retellings are like fantasy books, I’m more likely to read them than other genres, but there needs to be more than a concept for me to enjoy the story.


Now Onto the Discussion Part of This Post:

Do you enjoy fairytales, or do you find yourself avoiding them more often than not? Why?

What pros and cons do you think there are when it comes to retellings? Do you agree with the ones I’ve discovered or not?

What retellings would you like to see more of?

Let me know in the comments below.

Advertisements

79 thoughts on “Discussion Time: The Pros and Cons of Retellings

    1. Oh well in that case I’m glad there was something you enjoyed about my post even though you’re not a fan of fairytale retellings. I can’t get enough of them but I’m aware there are some cons when it comes to the genre as well! πŸ˜€

      Like

  1. Super interesting post. Soooooooo many bloggers out there LOVE all these retelling. I rarely–actually never–heard anyone say the opposite. It’s definitely refreshing to read retellings and manage to pinpoint the similarities and watch how the author brings their own twist to the original story. The retelling I’ve checked out the most is probably the ones based on Sherlock Holmes and I sometimes find it super sad when the author doesn’t manage to capture what the original books succeeded at and make it their own thing. But something about these retellings still make me want to read them hahah Great post, Beth!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed this post Lashaan. πŸ™‚ I’m definitely one of the bloggers that love retellings, like you said I think most of us do. There’s just something about picking one up and knowing where the story will go but still being able to be surprised at the new twist the author offers. I don’t think I’ve ever read a Sherlock Holmes retelling before, I did enjoy the original stories though so maybe I need to find some to add to my to-read list.
      Thanks Lashaan! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Awesome discussion topic, Beth! I absolutely adore retellings for those exact reasons. I love how they bring about my nostalgia and I love to see my favorite fairy tales revived in new and fresh ways. I especially enjoy the retellings that use the stories as foundation, but go in a completely different direction than expected (i.e. ACOTAR). That way I’m not always comparing the two stories, but at times, I really enjoy a straightforward retelling with original concepts and characters (i.e. Geekerella). I agree that most retellings are a bit dissatisfying in that we already know the endings, so there’s almost no way for us to expect anything different unless the author has proven throughout the book that they’re definitely not going down that same route. But I haven’t run into too many of those type of retellings. I really wish there were more retellings out there! They’re always welcome from me haha

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Azia! πŸ˜€ When it comes to nostalgia there’s really no other genre that does it quite like fairytale retellings does. Picking up a retelling of Alice in Wonderland or Beauty and the Beast always makes me feel like it’s the first time I’ve picked up the original tale all over again. I think when it comes down to it I enjoy all retellings equally, the only thing I require is a well written story, I don’t mind if it’s a book that goes in a completely different direction or one that retells the story with original concepts.
      Yeah I think because of that aspect with retellings you have to enjoy the journey that gets you to the end rather than the ending itself, and maybe not binge read too many of the same fairytale retellings because I think I’d get bored pretty quickly if I tried to do that! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Fairytales really do hold something special, don’t they? I’m so glad those stories never get old thanks to the many retellings coming out in both literature and film. That’s all I ask for, too: a well-written story. That’s all it takes for me to be happy for any book actually haha

        Liked by 1 person

      2. For most people it’s a big part of our childhood, and for most people it’s got to be something we love as well. There are always going to be plenty of retellings, and I am so so glad for that because I don’t think I could ever get tired of them! πŸ™‚
        Yeah, same here. πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the points you made. I find it so amazing when retellings can really be original. I mean, there are restrictions and points that need to be found in a retelling for a story to be deemed a real retelling, so being able to take a story and add a touch that makes it different but linked to the original so the reader can connect to it, must be such a difficult task!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Meggy. Yeah the unique retellings are always the ones I love the most as well. I almost feel like anyone can write a retelling but it takes a certain level of skill to write a unique one. Especially when there’s so much of the story already told in the original. πŸ™‚

      Like

  4. I love retellings, especially of legends. But I don’t really autobuy them.
    Excited as I get about retellings, I like them to be diverse, and go beyond “Beauty and the Beast but with Faeries” (sorry SJM). Make them LGBTAIQ* in some form and all bets are off though. (Obviously not the only form of diversity that’s important but it’s my main focus). I’d also love to see more stories retold? I’m okay with Beauty and the Beast or Cinderella, but they’re getting really boring at this point? There are so many stories around the world, where are the retellings?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I get what you mean, and I think now when people are more aware of the lack of diversity in books we need to see more in all genres, and that includes fairytale retellings. I still love all retellings though, and I’ll still pretty much autobuy any retelling I see but I get what you mean about the need to diversity as well. πŸ™‚
      I am definitely 110% with you on the need for more stories to be retold. I love Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella retellings but there are so many other fairytales out there just as amazing which don’t even have one retelling. Why aren’t they being reimagined?

      Like

  5. I’m a huge fan of retellings, I can’t say how many Beauty and the Beast different versions I’ve actually read so far (ItΒ΄s one of my favorites ) But there are so many classic stories out there with so much potential for a Good retelling and yet they get ignored. What I don’t like it’s how now it’s just one more marketing tool and It doesn’t matter if the book it’s actually a retelling or not.
    Flame in the Mist (Great Book By the Way) it’s sold as a Mulan retelling and I’m not going to lie, this picked my interest but it really isn’t an accurate description at all.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Same here, when it comes to retellings Beauty and the Beast is by far the most popular one so there are plenty out there to choose from, but there are so many fairytales that don’t even have one retelling at the moment and I’d love to see those retold as well. They could make brilliant YA books and they’d be something unique as well which I think is sorely needed in the retelling market at the moment. πŸ™‚
      Yeah I completely get what you mean there. I loved Flame in the Mist as well but if anything it’s Mulan inspired rather than Mulan retold, and there’s a difference between the two.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I do really enjoy retellings, and it’s funny, because I don’t think I even knew what they were last year, and now they’re some of my favorites! It was definitely the combination of the ACOTAR trilogy and the Lunar Chronicles that got me into it. I often don’t really read or catch-up with fairy tales, and without Disney, I probably wouldn’t even know about the classic fairtytales, to be honest, but if a retelling has an interesting premise, I’ll read it! I don’t think I have any specific wants or needs for retellings; as long as I enjoy it, thatl’s good for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I knew about retellings before I started blogging but considering how long I’ve been reading in general I didn’t discover them until recently either. I’m glad to hear they’re some of your favourites Mikaela, though with series like ACOTAR and The Lunar Chronicles considered retellings I’m not that surprised. Those two are favourite series of mine as well. πŸ™‚
      I suppose that’s a good way to go into the genre then. I’m a little bit different because I do know a lot about fairytales and what ones are out there so now I want to see some of the more obscure ones retold. Don’t get me wrong if a Beauty and the Beast retelling has an interesting premise I’ll still gladly pick it up but I need more unique reads too you know? πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Confession time: I’ve never actually read a retelling or fairytales in general. I used to when I was a bit younger but I somehow stopped reading them after I got into contemporary YA. Reading your post, I think it’s a shame I haven’t read more of them so I might add a few to my TBR! Like you said, I think it could be great nostalgic fun.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow, I am actually a little shocked by that (more by the not having read fairytales part than the not having read a retelling part though). I guess if you think about it a lot of YA contemporary books are like modern day fairytales, there’s usually a happily ever after and a sweet romance. πŸ™‚
      That’s great to hear, and in that case I hope you really love whatever retellings you add to your to-read list! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I love fairytale retellings as a rule, it’s like slipping into a comfortable chair you’ve always sat in, but it’s been restuffed and recovered and has a few modern touches to make it new and improved. However, I did end up DNFing The Shadow Queen recently because something about it just wasn’t working for me, but I can’t put my finger on what. I’m looking forward to Flame in the Mist, but I’ve seen mixed reviews. Same with Heartless. Hopefully I’ll love them both 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha, I definitely agree with you there. I think the nostalgia aspect is why I keep going back to fairytale retellings even though I’ve read the same fairytales retold over and over again. Oh that’s a shame about The Shadow Queen though I do get what you mean. I read it a little while ago (last year actually I think) and while I thought it was good there was something missing I couldn’t quite identify. Flame in the Mist is an amazing book in my opinion, and so is Heartless so I really hope you love them both too! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Great topic choice! 😊 I enjoy the occasional re-telling but only when it’s an original take on it and the author has used it to create something that’s theirs. No point reading the same thing over and over or knowing exactly how things will pan out before you even start. They seem to be a really big thing these days though, clearly they’re super popular. Probably because the publishers have an easy way to advertise them. I’m looking forward to reading Flane in the Mist though. Mulan is so awesome.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Ashley. πŸ™‚ I think I get what you mean, I will read any retelling out there but I certainly prefer the ones that have something unique than the ones that just retell the same story I’ve already read more than a few times before. They really are, which for me is a great thing because I love retellings but I guess they’re not for everyone are they? There are certain tropes/trends/genres that have their moment in the spotlight and I guess now is fairytale retellings. Oh Flame in the Mist is a brilliant book, I really hope you enjoy it! πŸ˜€

      Like

  10. I love retellings (well I love good ones anyway!) I think that the hazard with retellings is that you need to reimagine the story. Not just tell it again. There has to be a reason for setting the story in a certain time/place or changing the nature of some key element. I spoke about why I decided to retell Beauty and the Beast (though I’m aware of how many other retellings there are out there!) here:
    https://franlaniado.wordpress.com/2017/04/06/why-beauty-and-the-beast/
    and here:
    https://franlaniado.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/is-beauty-and-the-beast-about-stockholm-syndrome-my-answer/
    I also touch on some of the complexities of retellings here:
    https://franlaniado.wordpress.com/2017/05/03/fairy-tale-heroines-the-good-the-bad-and-the-sleepy/

    But I actually believe that more stories than we realize are fairy tale retellings (or reimaginings) because fairy tales, myths, and folklore have universal elements in them. Most of Jane Austen has echoes of Cinderella somewhere. Wuthering Heights twists the Adam and Eve story. You could see threads of Bluebeard and Beauty and the Beast running through Jane Eyre and Rebecca.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha, yeah just like with any other genre there are good and bad fairytale retellings out there. I love fairytale retellings but there have been a few I really haven’t enjoyed. That’s a really good point actually, and it brings to mind a story I read a little while back that felt more like a straight up retelling than a reimagining like it should have been. I didn’t rate that book very highly. :/
      Beauty and the Beast is a popular one but if it’s the one that connects with you the most obviously it’s going to be the one you want to focus on.
      You’ve actually succeeded in making me more interested in picking up classics than I think I’ve ever been before! πŸ™‚ I do agree there are hints of fairytales in more books than we realise. If you think about it hard enough you can probably assign a fairytale to every book, no matter the genre. πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Great post Beth! πŸ™‚ I agree with you that there are a lot of the same stories being retold over and over again, and that can get so boring. I’m not much of a fan of retellings. I do read them from time to time and some I really enjoy, like Cinder was a great series that retold stories. I can’t wait to get to Flame in the Mist, I actually didn’t know it was a Mulan retelling, so that makes me curious!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Meghan. πŸ™‚ As unique as retellings can be sometimes you want something different from another Beauty and the Beast retelling that you feel like you’ve read ten times before already. Cinder, and actually that whole series, was an all-time favourite of mine, simply because of how unique it is. It’s always the unique retellings like Cinder that I love the most. πŸ™‚
      Flame in the Mist is amazing, I would say it’s more Mulan inspired than Mulan retold but it’s a great book and I’m sure you’ll love it as well Meghan! πŸ™‚ ❀️

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I go back and forth on retellings. Sometimes I really enjoy them, and sometimes I wouldn’t go near them with a 10-foot pole. I’m at the point now where I want unique retellings rather than the same-old-same-old.

    I’d love to see some Grimm’s fairytales retellings, to be honest. Where are the stories about people being dumped with honey and shoes you dance to death in?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I feel like I may be coming up on that point as well. I mean at the moment I still enjoy all the retellings I pick up but the unique ones are the ones that stay with me for longer and that I enjoy the best too.
      Grimm fairytales would be amazing to see retold, or just any fairytales being retold with darker endings than the ‘happily ever afters’ we’re all used to. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  13. In general, I’m not a fan of retellings. It’s for one of the reasons you talked about – everything is so predictable. I already know how everything is going to turn out, so I never feel invested in the story. There are times when that’s not the case, though: when I’ve never read the original story or when the retelling is something totally new. My all-time favorite book is Witches Abroad by Terry Pratchett, a Cinderella retelling told from the POV of three antihero fairy godmothers. (Maskerade, TP’s Phantom of the Opera retelling, is another one of my favorites.)

    Ellie | On the Other Side of Reality

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah I guess for some readers knowing how the story ends is going to be a major downside of retellings. There can be a certain measure of uncertainty but when you know how things will end for the characters is it really real tension? I guess not given like you said you never feel invested in the story. πŸ™‚ Well at least there are some retellings you’ve ended up enjoying though. I love Terry Pratchett’s books, not that I’ve read many of them. Witches Abroad is one I still haven’t got to. πŸ˜€

      Like

  14. I love retellings with all my heart! I love that everyone can take a well known story and put their own spin on it. I don’t even mind that I might know the ending, like in Heartless, we all knew how it was going to end, but the suspense to see how she got to that point is what made it such a great read for me! Great post! πŸ˜€ ❀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Exactly, you can read a hundred retellings of Beauty and the Beast but because they’ve all been written by different authors there’s always a different story to explore and discover. Oh I still love retellings like Heartless, I just tend to find when I know the ending I end up hoping things will turn out differently, especially if it’s an unhappy ending like it was for Cath. With retellings it’s more about the journey reading the book than the conclusion isn’t it? Thanks so much! πŸ™‚ ❀️

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I also cannot resist a good re-telling Beth, they really are like magnets for this bookworm lol. I know that I’m drawn to them because I’m very nostalgic & love re-visiting stories from my childhood but it’s more than that. I think it’s the possibility of MORE, expanding on what we already love, if done right. I LOVED Hunted because it kept to the original while still flipping the roles of the main characters. Lovely discussion Beth πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Neither can I. They’re magnets for me and all I need to see in the blurb is that a book is a retellings and I just have to read it! πŸ™‚
      That’s a good way of looking at it actually, and a way I didn’t think of. For me the nostalgia is the main selling point. I loved fairytales when I was younger and now I’ve read most of them retellings are a way of experiencing the story all over again but in a slightly different way. Hunted was really good, it stuck close to the original tale in a fe places but there was something about it that really made it stand out. Thanks so much Lilly! πŸ™‚ ❀️

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I agree…. I want to see more diverse retellings… I haven’t read a retelling before, I’ve read heartless though and it’s more like a prequel I guess… anyway, nice post 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are so so so many fairytales out there that could be amazing retellings. I’d love I see some of them actually retold one day. Yeah Heartless is a prequel I agree, just a different way of retelling the Alice in Wonderland story in my opinion.
      Thanks so much! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I like retellings, but I think they are rather overdone nowadays. Like sometimes it makes me wonder if there is a dearth of original ideas that makes so may writers resort to them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are a lot of retellings out there, and following that line of thought I don’t feel like retellings overall have been overdone but retellings of the same fairytale you know? There are plenty of the more obscure fairytales out there that could be re-told, and that I don’t think have even one retelling at the moment. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I love how you included Percy Jackson in this discussion about retellings, because I don’t usually think about it as a retelling, but you’re correct. It does retell Greek myths and build upon that basis. I love retellings mostly because of the nostalgia, like you, and the comfort I feel knowing how it will play out. That being said, i agree that there are too many Beauty and the Beast retellings out there. Even if it isn’t specifically marketed as one, how many times have you read a book where someone falls in love with someone else not traditionally beautiful or who had some sort of accident? I wish, like you, that there was more of a variety within retellings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much. Percy Jackson is an all-time favourite of mine and I definitely count it as a retellings because it may not stick closely to the events of the original myths but it does use them as inspiration you know? Nostalgia is a powerful thing when it comes to books isn’t it? I think it’s why I re-read old favourites of mine so much as well. πŸ™‚ Sometimes I wonder why Beauty and the Beast is such a popular story to retell, and yeah like you said there are books that use it as an inspiration even if the story isn’t strictly a retelling. I mean, I love Beauty and the Beast retellings don’t get me wrong, but why is it so popular compared to all the other fairytales out there? More variety is definitely needed yes! πŸ™‚

      Like

    1. I suppose that’s a good way to go when it comes to fairytale retellings. I’m the opposite though because I do seek them out. πŸ™‚
      Yeah I do the same sometimes, it’s interesting in the retellings seeing where the influence of the original fairytales comes into play.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. amazing discussion post! i absolutely love fairy tales, i also agree with everything you stated here. i get really excited for retellings. however, like you mentioned sometimes i already know what to expect. like your example of heartless. i think beauty and the beast was a little overdone. i have to applaud SJM for what she did though, she only used some aspects of it for the first book and then really made it her own. i would love to see more snow white retellings ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much Gretchen! Yeah even though I knew what was coming in Heartless I still loved the journey that came with reading the story all the way to the end. I think no matter what fairytale is being told there’s always a fresh take on it that means you’re never reading the same book twice. Still I would like to see fairytales other than Beauty and the Beast retold. πŸ™‚
      SJM’s fairytale retellings were wonderful reads. It’s an example of fairytale retellings I really enjoy, the idea of taking only the barest hints of the original tale and creating something wholly and completely new.
      Ohh, Snow White is one I didn’t think of before, and now you mention it there’s not many out there is there? Strange because it is a very popular fairytale.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. OMG yes Beth!! I absolutely loved Heartless and was torn reading it all the way through because regardless of the ending that I knew was coming…I still had some hope lol…Marissa Meyer is like queen of retellings! I know that Winter is a Snow White retelling but I have yet to read that one. Other than that, I cannot think at the top of my head for another title. You are correct, it is a very popular fairytale.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m the same with any kind of retelling like Heartless. If I knew there’s a unhappy ending I still hold a tiny glimmer of hope that the author will change the way the story ends, just for this one book.
        She really is, and Winter is a brilliant Snow White retelling, but other than that one I can’t think of any others off the top of my head.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I love retellings and the whole idea of intertextuality that several authors of today use. Likewise, I like the nostalgic feeling and overall evocative tone that it seems to establish for the book. I’ve recently read Michael Cunningham’s A Wild Swan and Other Tales and I absolutely loved it because Cunningham retells the nursery rhymes we have grown up with such as Jack & the Beanstock but adds a dark twist which completely changes the structure and therefore how the tales end.
    Great discussion post, thanks πŸ™‚
    Happy tale-reading πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. For me what I love most about fairytales is the mixture of nostalgia you get from knowing the story so well but the adventure of not knowing what will come next. There’s always something new even if your reading the same fairytale retold over and over again.
      I’ll definitely have to look up A Wild Swan and Other Tales now you’ve mentioned it. There’s a part of me that really enjoys stories that include dark twists, and the way you’ve described Cunningham’s work sounds very intriguing.
      Thanks so much, I’m glad you enjoyed this discussion! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  21. This is such a lovely discussion post, Beth! I enjoy fairytales and, until about one year ago, I had NO idea there was such a thing as retellings. Now, I’m more and more drawn to them as I think they’re such a great way to give in to nostalgia, while at the same time discovering a completely different story, in a whole new light πŸ™‚ As for a retelling I’d love to see more of…. I think I’ll go with ” I should READ more of” and it would be Beauty and the Beast for sure! ❀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much Marie! πŸ™‚ ❀ Honestly I can't remember when I discovered retellings, or even what the first retelling I discovered was, but I've loved them since the very beginning and I've been drawn to them since the beginning as well. Nostalgia is a powerful thing when it comes to books, and it works so well with fairytale retellings as well. πŸ™‚
      Ha, well you're definitely in luck because there are loads of Beauty and the Beast retellings out there, more than any other fairytale I think. There are probably loads you'll love! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  22. This is such a good discussion topic! I love retellings as well but I prefer ones that have the same basic premise and take the story in a different direction, kind of combining the nostalgia of the fairy tale with a fresh new idea.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much Annie. πŸ™‚ I love pretty much any retelling as long as there’s some hint of the original story somewhere, but it’s always interesting seeing different authors’ takes on fairytales and how they choose to turn the story in a different direction. It makes you feel like you’re reading something completely new while still having the comfort of it being a fairytale you already know so well. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Ooh, what a great discussion! I personally love retellings because they offer a fresh point of view on a tale we already know. OR it can offer a look at a story we haven’t heard before! But I DO agree that you can only read a certain amount of retellings before you get bored. (That’s why you should always have creative retellings haha.) I think it’d be cool, though, if the retelling ended with something that was TOTALLY different from the original tale!

    I think that I’ll like retellings if they’re fresh, new, and original. If they’re like another retelling… I’ll probably get bored. BUT, I’ll probably still read it any way, just to see how I like it. XD Love this discussion, Beth, and I think you can do pros and cons of so many other genres! πŸ˜›

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much May! πŸ™‚ I think that’s why so many people, myself included, love retellings. There’s the nostalgia of it being a favourite story you know so well, but there’s also the unknown in it being a new tale altogether. There are some fairytales I feel like I see too much of (Beauty and the Beast is one) but at the same time there always something different about each retelling I pick up (creativity is key I definitely agree with you there). Still it would be nice to see some other, more obscure fairytales get their chance to shine.
      There are some retellings I’ve read that stick too close to the source material as well, I can get bored of those quickly because it’s like reading the same story all over again and there’s not much to set it apart. I definitely prefer the stories that offer something original. Thanks so much May, and maybe I will at some point as well! πŸ˜€ ❀

      Like

  24. I do love retelling and find myself more drawn to fairytales , one of my favorites of all time (I’m not sure if this is considered as a retelling or no ) is “the book of lost things ” by John Connolley , he made a story that included many fairytales but he twisted the stories and made them dark and messed up. I love that book with all my heart!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Same here, all a book needs to do is hint at the fact that it’s a retelling and I know I need to read it. Oh, that sounds like an interesting book, I’m definitely going to have to check it out because it sounds amazing just from how you’ve described it. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s